BAJA BIRDER ENDEMIC PAGE

SIX ENDEMIC BIRDS OF SOUTHERN BAJA



SUBJECT: Grey Thrasher

DATE: December 06, 2005

LOCATION: Found in southern area of Baja, Norte and all of Baja, Sur. These pictures were taken in Los Frailles and my backyard in La Ribera, Baja, Mexico. These areas are near 23.5 N and 110 W. Near the Tropic of Cancer , on the Sea of Cortez.

HABITAT: Arid to semi-arid, open and semi-open with cacti, scrub, scattered bushes and trees.

DESCRIPTION: The Grey Thrasher is endemic to Baja. Field marks are: golden yellow eyes, bill and legs are grey, head and underparts grey to brownish, rump and uppertail coverts, two white wingbars, breast marked with elongated blackish spots.

These three pictures taken in my backyard. They show the field marks very well. Note that his left foot is missing the 'toes'








These pictures were taken at Los Frailles, in spring. A pair were tending a nest that had three chicks.









SUBJECT: San Lucas Robin

DATE: March and April 2006

LOCATION: San Deiniso and Santiago

HABITAT: Riparain, oak forest, mountains 1000-1500 ft elevation.

DESCRIPTION: Very similar to American Robin (and may be sub-specie) much paler coloration and very different song. Not common out of habitat. Best chance of sighting is winter/spring when birds are lower.




SUBJECT: Xanthus Hummingbird

DATE: Very common, seen daily, year round.

LOCATION: Widespread over southern Baja.

HABITAT: Lowland thorn, desert, scrub.

DESCRIPTION: Very bold. Will defend feeders against much larger orioles.




SUBJECT: Baird's Junco

DATE: No photograph yet

LOCATION: Above Boca de La Sierra

HABITAT: Ripirain, oak steam bed, elevation 500 ft.

DESCRIPTION: Sighted three different birds on two separate trips.


SUBJECT: Cape (Northern) Pygmy Owl

DATE: No photograph yet

LOCATION: High mountains of the Victoria, near Cabo

HABITAT: Pine, oak forest 2000 down to 1000 ft.

DESCRIPTION: Have not seen this owl in three years looking. The hoot pattern is unique and the best chance is identification by sound. No other local owl sounds like the Cape Pygmy.

BACK